Evonne Wareham: A Crime Writer Trying Her Hand at Romantic Comedy!

Last week we released the fabulous Summer in San Remo by Evonne Wareham in paperback. Evonne normally writes romantic suspense and Summer in San Remo is her first foray into romantic comedy (with a hint of mystery) so today on the blog she talks about that transition – and what we could potentially expect from her in the future 😉

It’s common knowledge that I have criminal tendencies.

That’s in my writing life, I hasten to add. All the disreputable stuff is strictly on the page – I’m far too much of a scaredy-cat to go anywhere near anything nefarious in real life.

I’m not sure exactly what draws me to the dark side, but something does. As my signature writing genre is romantic suspense, this is not too much of a surprise – the thriller and the love story get equal billing in those books, but what happens when a romantic suspense writer turns to writing romantic comedy? You’re ahead of me – romantic comedy, with a dusting of crime.

Summer in San Remo, which has just come out in paperback, is my first venture into the lighter side of romance. Cassie and Jake spar and bicker and kiss and make up, in the tradition of romantic comedy heroines and heroes, while investigating a mystery that takes them – you’ve guessed it again – to the Italian Riviera. It was great fun to write and I like to think that the mystery element adds just a little bit of an edge to the story. It is a mystery, rather than an all-out crime – no dead bodies or truly nasty villains – I save those for the thrillers.

I drew on memories of a fabulous holiday that I spent in San Remo, some years ago, for a glamorous background. The book features locations on both the French and Italian sides of the border, with lots of sunshine, a luxurious villa, parties and masses of food, particularly ice-cream – and shoes – but the mystery is the thing that drives the plot. It’s the reason that Cassie finds herself in San Remo, back with her first ever boyfriend, Jake. When he disappeared to New York twelve years ago she never thought she’d see him again. And, of course, she never wanted to see him again. Of course she didn’t.

Right now she’s putting all her energy and talent into building a successful business, and she really doesn’t need distractions. And Jake seems determined to be one big distraction. Back in the U.K. to take over running the family detective agency for the summer, he’s filthy rich, even more gorgeous, and a complete pain in Cassie’s … neck. Unfortunately he also seems to be the only person who can help her with a job for a new and very enigmatic client …

And then somehow Cassie finds herself agreeing to take a trip to San Remo with him …

I had a really good time writing the book, and I loved spending time with Jake and Cassie – so much so, that I want to write more romantic comedy and I’m intending that Summer in San Remo should be the first of a series. That project is currently proceeding at the pace of a bed of sloths, but like all determined sloths, it will get there in the end.

A series naturally has to have a thread to hold it together and, with Jake involved in running a detective agency, that seemed to be the perfect choice. And a detective agency implies a certain amount of crooked goings on – and here I am back with the crime again.

I really can’t stay away from it.

Summer in San Remo is now available in paperback from all good book retailers and also as an eBook through all eBook sellers. Click on the image above for purchasing options. 

For more on Evonne
Follow her on Twitter @EvonneWareham
Like her on Facebook Evonne Wareham
Check out her blog www.evonneonwednesday.com

 

When a Fictional World Becomes Your Reality

Yesterday Morton S. Gray’s gripping debut novel, The Girl on the Beach, came out in paperback. Today Morton joins us on the blog to chat about the setting of her first novel (which is the same for her upcoming second novel, The Truth Lies Buried) – the fictional town of Borteen – and how a made-up place has started to feel very real to her! 

My debut novel, The Girl on the Beach is set in my fictional seaside town of Borteen. It is amazing how quickly a fictional place can begin to feel completely real. I can walk down the streets and name the shops and their owners, I know what the views are like from various places in the town and surrounding countryside, even how wide the roads are.

When it came to writing Book 2 in the Borteen Secrets Series – The Truth Lies Buried – my editor asked if I had a map of the town, so I drew one and added pictures to show how I envisaged the buildings and various landmarks. It was surprisingly easy to do, because I had walked the streets so often in my head. I intend to tidy this up at some point so that I can let readers see it, but at the moment the map includes some pictures to which I don’t have sharing rights.

My characters are also very real to me. If any of them walked into a café I would recognise them. I know their appearance and demeanour, how they interact as if I was inside of them looking out of their eyes, as well as from observing them through the eyes of other characters. Not only do I know how their facial features change when confronted with the situations I put them into in my books, but I know how they feel too, how their heart rate reacts and the sensations on their skin.

I suppose what I am trying to say is that I can put myself inside my story, fictional town and even inside the characters. I realise that makes me sound really odd, but it is how the process of writing works for me. I guess I see my books unfold like films in front of me.

This experience isn’t unique amongst writers, but friends who haven’t had this encounter with a fictional world can look at me a little strangely if I talk about it, especially when I mention that other Borteen residents mentioned in The Girl on the Beach and The Truth Lies Buried are clamouring for their stories to be told too. I guess that means there will be other books in the Borteen Secrets Series!

The Girl on the Beach is now available to purchase in paperback. Click on the banner below for purchasing options. 

Morton’s upcoming novel, The Truth Lies Buried, will be out on 1st May as an eBook. Click on the banner below for pre-order options. 

For more information on Morton S. Gray:

Follow her on Twitter: @MortonSGray
Like her page on Facebook: Morton S. Gray Author
Check out her website: www.mortonsgray.com 

 

How do women survive in the mad, bad world of politics and spin?

9781781892770Sarah Waights, author of Never Marry a Politician, talks about the inspiration for her novel, and about the plight of the strong, capable women who are often behind the rise of the world’s most powerful men …

Long before Hillary Clinton decided to stand for the presidency herself there was a joke doing the rounds and it went like this:

Hillary and Bill drive into a gas station. As the attendant is filling their car, Bill says, “Look Hillary, isn’t that the guy you used to date at college?  Just imagine, if you’d married him not me you’d be the wife of a gas station attendant.”

“Nonsense, Bill,” said Hillary, “If I’d married him instead of you, he would be the President of the United States.”

And therein lies the truth that inspired my novel Never Marry a Politician.  Behind every successful man is a very clever woman and the cleverest women of all may well be the ones who wield their power covertly, using their man as a puppet to achieve their own ambitions. Shakespeare was fascinated with the concept; What was Lady Macbeth if not quite literally the power behind the throne? Poor old Macbeth didn’t have an idea in his head other than the ones she put there and – boy – did she have some big ideas. Incidentally, Shakespeare also portrayed her as a raving, hormonal lunatic and ensured she came to a sticky end but – hey ho – feminism had a long way to go back then.

Not that we have come as far as we would like to think, as I peek between my fingers at Hillary Clinton’s current presidential campaign. Despite the social progress that allowed Obama to get into power, there has still never been a female president. In the UK’s political system I watch with horrified fascination as those handpicked female members of our elected parliament – the brightest of the bright – have to run the gauntlet of press and parliamentary preoccupation with their legs, cleavage, shoes and marital status before they are allowed to express a view or table a policy. Even then, the apparatchiks are far more likely to hand them a brief concerning childcare provision than, say, defence policy. I feel even more sorry for the women who – quite by chance – happen to be married to a man who is ambitious for a career in politics. That is what happened to my poor heroine, Emily, who quickly learns that – despite it being the 21st century – her role is to stand meekly in the background gazing at her husband admiringly.

“I do have an opinion of my own,” she protests to her lover, Matt.

“Sure you do,” he replies, “but only when your husband’s advisors have told you what it is.”

The ‘gazing admiringly’ thing, by the way, is one I felt Nancy Reagan did awfully well and that made her an excellent President’s wife.  The UK equivalent would probably be the ‘wife’ of our one and only female Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher; her spouse, Dennis, was stalwart, supportive and above criticism. Always. When he died all anyone could remember him doing was chatting amiably about golf and mixing a killer gin and tonic. Could she have done it without him? Personally, I doubt it.

One would like to think that women signing up to the husband’s job to the detriment of her own autonomy was an outdated idea. When I was a child, my father was in the diplomatic corps which involved lots of making polite conversation with his opposite numbers from other countries. My mother’s role – it was made quite clear – was to play the Nancy Reagan to his Ronald, taking the wives out shopping and giving them tea and cake while the men got down to the real business of – well – being diplomatic. But that can’t be how things work now, can it?

I actually think it isn’t.  I think it’s worse.  I have built a career and raised a family in an era where women were not just supposed to ‘have it all’, they had to somehow ‘do it all’ too. Achieving the role of the perfect wife and mother at the same time as having a ball-breakingly successful career is now less of a freedom and more of a moral obligation. We owe it to our mothers and grandmothers who were left entirely without bust support after all that bra-burning so that we – the newly empowered (and exhausted) generation – could rule the world. In the general election in the UK last year, the media was fascinated by the wives of the political leaders. It was clear that, the female vote was being courted. In order to have any respect for the husband, we had to admire the wife. Here, wearing a pinny and churning out perfect cupcakes was key but not, in itself, enough. Instead, the politician’s wives, with their perfect, smiley children in tow, had to bake, smile, be immaculately dressed AND have impressive careers (but no opinions, mind). Two are high-flying lawyers and another is ‘something very clever’ in product development for a really classy stationery design company – phew, nothing controversial about notepads, thank heaven. The high (or low) point of the entire campaign was the week when all the leaders were photographed in their own kitchens, drinking coffee with their wives – cue pages and pages of coverage analysing the political significance of everything from the mugs they were drinking out of to the brand of olive oil sitting next to the stove.  Honestly!  I know… madness.

Actually, the scariest thing I ever did was to marry. Although I knew almost as soon as I met him that I loved my husband-to-be – and that I trusted him – my mind whirled with terror at the thought of how being a wife and having children, would make me vulnerable, financially dependent, that I would somehow lose myself, that I would feel compelled to become a mirror of my husband to justify his protection of me … I needn’t have fretted. My husband has never wanted me to become anything other than a more developed, fulfilled, version of myself. We have taken turns, over the years, to be the breadwinner, raise the children, take time out to follow our dreams (get me! A published novelist no less …) and just be whoever we felt we needed to be. Of course that has meant being supportive to each other, being loyal, being the person who is always on side – even when you’ve made a right royal  tit of yourself – but it has never had to mean turning into a person who exists purely to show our partner in a better light.

And so – just like my poor character Emily, we all struggle on – walking the tightrope of career versus family, spin versus substance, truth versus diplomacy and wine versus waistline. Thank God for the escapism of other people’s stories.

Never Marry a Politician is now available in paperback. Click on one of the links below to purchase.

Amazon UK   Amazon US  Amazon CA

For more on Sarah, follow her on Twitter @SarahWaights

The Legend of the Swashbuckling Pirate

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The Legend of the Gypsy Hawk by Sally Malcolm is a swashbuckling pirate tale. In this fascinating post, the author describes some of the legends that inspired her novel …

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A pirate is hanged at Execution Dock.

Pirates have a special place in the heart of all romantics, especially those with a taste for adventure and a healthy disregard for authority.

They are the ultimate rebels, the punk rockers of their day, thumbing their nose at social convention.  Scandalous in the silks and brocade reserved exclusively for the upper class, pirates flaunted their wealth and sexuality, even allowing women to join, and occasionally lead, their crews.

Pirates thrilled and shocked their contemporaries, and very quickly legends sprang up around these fascinating rebels.

Trials of infamous pirates like Captain Kidd were reported in salacious (although not entirely accurate) detail in the eighteenth century scandal rags, and that’s where the pirate myths really began.  So captivating were the stories woven around these men that, while awaiting death, renowned pirates were visited in their cells by dazzled women eager for a little pirate stardust …

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The Flying Dutchman, or, The Demon Ship, published 1839.

By the 1830s, with an increasingly literate population eager for entertainment, the ‘penny-bloods’ began to dip into pirate legends from the Golden Age of Piracy. One of the earliest was The Flying Dutchman, published in 1839, telling the tale of the legendary ghost ship and designed to horrify, thrill and delight its eager readers.

And so began an industry. From The Pirates of Penzance and Treasure Island, to movies like Captain Blood and Pirates of the Caribbean, our fascination with the outrageous, dangerous and rebellious pirate remains as enduring as ever.

Long may it continue, say I.

If you enjoyed Sally’s post on pirates, why not give her novel a go? The Legend of the Gypsy Hawk is now available in paperback from all good bookshops and stockists. Purchase it here:

Amazon UK: http://goo.gl/LFpAhz

Amazon US: http://goo.gl/sELQfe

If you need more convincing, watch the fab book trailer here:

https://youtu.be/InHVhS0LMDs