Moonbeams in a Jar: On Location

At the beginning of the week we released Moonbeams in a Jar by Christine Stovell – a sweet novella for dog lovers, travel lovers, romance lovers … and everyone in between! Today Christine joins us on the blog to tell us a little about the once-in-a-lifetime holiday that inspired the story … 

“Take every chance you get in life,” the saying goes, “because some things only happen once.” When my husband, Tom, asked me one summer evening which destination I’d choose if I could hop on a plane the next day and go anywhere in the world, I never expected him to act on my words and surprise me with a trip to Hong Kong. I was so taken aback – and so anxious about whether or not we could afford it – that I was initially quite cross. Like Chloe, the heroine of my novella Moonbeams in a Jar, I’m a bit of a planner, whereas Tom, like my hero, Ryan, is far more spontaneous. Left to me, we might never have seen Hong Kong and then I would have missed out on one of the most thrilling holidays of my life.

I didn’t know then that Hong Kong would feature in my novella, but when Chloe decides to splurge on a big holiday before starting her new job, I realised it would make the perfect place for my couple to explore their feelings for each other… and to learn that love rarely arrives conveniently or according to plan. The sights, sounds, smells and tastes of my trip stayed with me and many of those experiences worked their way into Chloe and Ryan’s visit … I’ll leave you to guess which ones!

Shaking my fortune stick at Wong Tai Sin Temple

HK 013 Star Ferry

Chloe and Ryan’s story begins in Little Spitmarsh, my fictional seaside town where Ryan, a photographer, lives conveniently close to his fiery cousin Tansy who regularly looks after Ryan’s basset hound, Fred. The inspiration for Little Spitmarsh came when Tom and I sailed half way round Britain in a vintage wooden boat in a series of what I only half-jokingly call ‘The Epic Voyages’ which, again, took me way out of my comfort zone. At the time we kept our boat in a small boatyard on the East Anglian coast and had a very happy time there pottering round the backwaters. That’s when the location for Little Spitmarsh really started to take shape and became real to me.

East Anglia

The opening scene for my first Little Spitmarsh novel, Turning the Tide, began when I ‘saw’ a troubled young woman in dungarees walking by the side of a creek and knew I had to tell her story. That was Harry Watling, someone who is more than capable of standing on her own two feet, a girl who isn’t afraid of breaking a fingernail and who doesn’t need a man to change an electric plug for her. From there, a whole cast of characters introduced themselves and continue to wander in and out of my Little Spitmarsh series which can all be read as stand alone stories.

So … when I started writing Moonbeams in a Jar I knew that Little Spitmarsh would be the starting point and that my heroine, Chloe, would go on her dream holiday to Hong Kong. I was a bit surprised when Snowdonia crept into the story, but there was no stopping Ryan, who loves working in difficult, remote terrain and was determined to get some stunning shots of the mountain in its darkest mood. I’m lucky enough to live within striking distance of Snowdonia and have enjoyed many climbs in the hills exploring these rugged peaks and enjoying the magnificent views. It’s never easy, but if the weather turns against you and you’re not prepared – as Ryan discovers – the places of refuge are few and far between. As it turns out, being caught in an horrendous storm on an exposed mountainside is only the start of Ryan’s problems!

Snowdonia in good weather!

Chloe and Ryan’s road to their Happy Ever After takes many twists and turns along the way as Chloe learns to take more chances and Ryan realises that love can’t be put on hold. I hope that Moonbeams in a Jar will give you a flavour of some of the locations they visit along the way and that you will enjoy travelling with them.

Hong Kong at sunset

Moonbeams in a Jar is now available to buy as an eBook on all platforms. Click the banner below for purchasing options.

For more information on Christine Stovell:

Follow her on Twitter @chrisstovell 

Like her on Facebook Christine Stovell, Author

Check out her blog www.homethoughtsweekly.blogspot.co.uk

History and Imagination: Living in the Past by Jane Lovering

9781781893913

Last week on Valentine’s Day we released Living in the Past by Jane Lovering – which is Jane’s first timeslip book and, rather uniquely, is set between the present day and the Bronze Age! On the blog today, Jane talks a little bit about why she decided on this particular time period and the advantages and disadvantages of writing about (not so recent) history … 

I’ve always been fascinated by history – but not recorded history. My particular love is for the history that exists before people started writing stuff down and putting ‘spins’ on it. The history I love is conjectural, where only traces are left we have to imagine what those things were, and what they were for. So, essentially, it’s a history that has already come with its own stories, because we have to fill in so many gaps with our imagination.

This is why I wanted to write a timeslip, featuring a period of history that really doesn’t give us much in the way of definite answers. It’s all traces in the soil, a few artifacts for us to argue over and some tantalising art. We don’t know whether some things were ritual, practical or ‘just because’ and writing a book is one way of saying ‘maybe this is what happened and what these things were for.’ Of course, I don’t know. Just like I’ve imagined midwinter and midsummer gatherings where ‘greater family’ would gather to trade animals and goods. I mean, it seems reasonable, they were going to need new bloodstock from unrelated animals and items that they perhaps didn’t have the means to manufacture. We have very little evidence for this, but it’s the sort of thing that might well have happened, so I’ve just pushed imagination forward a bit!  We’ve got a good idea of what the outside of a Bronze Age house might look like, but no idea what they would have had inside, apart from a hearth, so I’ve dreamed up home-carved furniture and a stack of wood, drying for winter beside the fire, meat hung up to cure in the smoke and a bed covered in woven blankets. I don’t know whether any of these things really did get stored inside, but it seems logical to think that they might.

I fully expect to be overtaken by research in the future. Fifty years ago who would have dreamed of some of the reconstruction and archaeological techniques we have today? Ground penetrating radar, geo-phys in all its glory, microscopes that can tell us what people ate and isotope analysis that can tell us where animals and people were born and raised. It’s amazing stuff.

And romance? Well, love is love and has been through the ages. Humans must have fallen in love back in the Bronze Age, just as they do now. It’s an emotion that’s necessary to human continuation, after all! Would it have been so different four thousand years ago? And as for time-travel, well, maybe that’s just another discovery we are waiting to happen …

Living in the Past is now available to purchase on all eBook platforms. Click on the banner below for buying options. 

LIP OUT NOW

For more on Jane Lovering:
Follow her on Twitter: @janelovering
Like her on Facebook: Jane Lovering Author
Check out her website: http://www.janelovering.co.uk/