Who is the Girl on the Beach?

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In January we released Morton S. Gray’s fast-paced and suspenseful The Girl on the Beach, which is set in the fictional seaside town of Borteen. Today on the blog, Morton talks about her love for the seaside – and who ‘the girl on the beach’ might be … 

I do like to be beside the seaside … It’s quite apt that my debut novel is called The Girl on the Beach. For as long as I can remember, I’ve loved being by the sea. A walk along the sand, especially with incoming waves, is good for the soul like nothing else on earth.

We used to holiday at the beach when I was a child, Tenby, Saundersfoot, Woolacombe, being amongst some of the resorts I remember. I’m the blonde one in the picture with my sister – didn’t I look sweet? I must be about nine here.

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Ironically, I probably live as far from the sea as you can get in England, but then maybe that is why it’s special for me to go to the coast.

There is nothing I love better than beachcombing, trawling the edge of the surf for interesting stones and sea glass. I’m fascinated by those who produce jewellery incorporating things found on the shore and I want to learn to set stones and glass into silver jewellery sometime very soon.

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Llandanawg, near Harlech, North Wales – Morton Gray with little white dog.

My favourite beaches these days are Bamburgh in Northumberland, Llandanawg, near Harlech in North Wales and Barricane Bay Beach at Woolacombe.

My fictional seaside town – Borteen, from The Girl on the Beach is an amalgamation of many seaside places I have visited. When we first meet my hero, Harry, he is disappointed that Borteen doesn’t have a surfing beach like those in Devon and Cornwall he’s used to. Ellie, the heroine, has her gallery in one of the alleyways off the High Street in the town and she loves the beach. A lot of the action in the book takes place on or around the sands and the promenade behind the beach.

I’m busy writing more books centred around this fictional seaside town and its beach, so I do hope my readers like the setting too. The sound of the waves and the wind near the shore, the smell of the sea, the soothing feel of the sea and sand on bare feet – I’m sighing just thinking about it!

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Bamburgh Sands, Northumberland

One of my favourite memories is sitting on the café steps above Barricane Beach in Woolacombe, sipping hot tea and watching the sun go down. That moment when the sun merges with the water is truly magical.

Who is the real girl on the beach? It’s me! In my heart, anyway.

The Girl on the Beach is available as an eBook on all platforms. Click HERE for buying options. 

 For more on Morton visit:

Website: www.mortonsgray.com

Twitter: @MortonSGray

The Legend of the Swashbuckling Pirate

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The Legend of the Gypsy Hawk by Sally Malcolm is a swashbuckling pirate tale. In this fascinating post, the author describes some of the legends that inspired her novel …

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A pirate is hanged at Execution Dock.

Pirates have a special place in the heart of all romantics, especially those with a taste for adventure and a healthy disregard for authority.

They are the ultimate rebels, the punk rockers of their day, thumbing their nose at social convention.  Scandalous in the silks and brocade reserved exclusively for the upper class, pirates flaunted their wealth and sexuality, even allowing women to join, and occasionally lead, their crews.

Pirates thrilled and shocked their contemporaries, and very quickly legends sprang up around these fascinating rebels.

Trials of infamous pirates like Captain Kidd were reported in salacious (although not entirely accurate) detail in the eighteenth century scandal rags, and that’s where the pirate myths really began.  So captivating were the stories woven around these men that, while awaiting death, renowned pirates were visited in their cells by dazzled women eager for a little pirate stardust …

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The Flying Dutchman, or, The Demon Ship, published 1839.

By the 1830s, with an increasingly literate population eager for entertainment, the ‘penny-bloods’ began to dip into pirate legends from the Golden Age of Piracy. One of the earliest was The Flying Dutchman, published in 1839, telling the tale of the legendary ghost ship and designed to horrify, thrill and delight its eager readers.

And so began an industry. From The Pirates of Penzance and Treasure Island, to movies like Captain Blood and Pirates of the Caribbean, our fascination with the outrageous, dangerous and rebellious pirate remains as enduring as ever.

Long may it continue, say I.

If you enjoyed Sally’s post on pirates, why not give her novel a go? The Legend of the Gypsy Hawk is now available in paperback from all good bookshops and stockists. Purchase it here:

Amazon UK: http://goo.gl/LFpAhz

Amazon US: http://goo.gl/sELQfe

If you need more convincing, watch the fab book trailer here:

https://youtu.be/InHVhS0LMDs

 

All I want for Christmas …

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A festive post with a difference written by our author, Sarah Waights. Have you ever wished that getting what you wanted most in life was as simple as writing to Father Christmas? Emma does … 

Dear Father Christmas,

You don’t mind if I call you ‘Father Christmas’ do you? Tell me if I’m wrong but I’m guessing you’re something of a traditionalist. That said, I appreciate ‘Santa’ has been creeping up the popularity ranks for a while now. It’s all ‘Santa baby’ and ‘I saw mummy kissing Santa Claus’… I appreciate singing ‘Father Christmas is coming to town’ doesn’t exactly trip off the tongue. Maybe I’m just a late adopter, but I can’t go with ‘Santa’, I really can’t. For me ‘Santa’ sounds like an item of sanitary protection. It evokes pictures of lithe young women roller-skating in unfeasibly tiny shorts, diving into swimming pools displaying unlikely levels of abdominal muscle perfection, or flying kites on the tops of hills, all whilst laughing inanely with their girlfriends and exchanging flirty but empowered looks with handsome young men who are looking on admiringly. Why? Because this is apparently what advertising men think women get up to when they’ve got their period … God knows why. I definitely don’t. So, the point is, say the word ‘Santa’ and feminine hygiene is what pops into my mind – as it probably will into yours from now on too. Sorry about that.

Actually, whilst I’m apologising, let me just come straight out and acknowledge the elephant in the room; you will have noticed I’ve not written to you since I was seven. Twenty years, eh?  How time flies … I appreciate, belatedly, you might have assumed it was because you didn’t fully deliver on my expectations that time. Obviously the tiny tears doll which eats yellow gunk and then dirties its nappy when you squeeze it was bang on, and the extensive list of stocking fillers was broadly fulfilled – no complaints – but I do want to make it absolutely clear that there are no hard feelings about you not coming through with the real, live penguin. To be honest, my geographical knowledge as a seven year old was poor (it isn’t much better now) and I simply thought it would be a case of leaning out of your sleigh and grabbing one in passing. I certainly didn’t expect you to go all the way to the South Pole, which you obviously wouldn’t have had time to do. In hindsight, I’m glad I didn’t ask for a polar bear.

Talking of hindsight, I imagine we need to cover the issue of whether I’ve been naughty or nice. Are we talking just the last year or the whole couple of decades? I’ll assume the latter but, for brevity, we had better stick to edited highlights. So let’s see … I’ve always tried not to be knowingly cruel (but also see below), I’ve been polite and grateful to my mother, apart from the obligatory teenage years obviously, and broadly I think my friends would say I’m a reasonably nice person.

And now for the last year. Well – they say “you hurt the ones you love” don’t they? And I have. I know I have and I am so desperately sorry, (although I suppose it’s not you I should be apologising to). All I can say is I would do anything for things to be simple again, to wind back the clock and be asking for a doll or a new packet of felt tips because I left the lids off the old ones. But that isn’t how life works. So here goes: The reason I am writing to you now, is because I have to ask for just one, final thing, and after that I promise I will never ask ever again. You see, Father Christmas (or, what the hell, ‘Santa’ if you prefer), the only thing I want – not just for Christmas but for ever and ever is James. And if he were to come down my chimney and back into my life I promise I would love him and cherish him and never let him go until death us do part. He could even watch the football. Sometimes. Potentially in return for emptying the dishwasher occasionally. I’m not unreasonable …

Lots of love

Emma xxx

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Find out more about Sarah’s debut novel, Never Marry a Politician:

@SarahWaights

www.sarahwaights.com

Never Marry a Politician is available on Kindle:

Kindle UK  Kindle US

 

Kiss and Don’t tell (until the end) – why I love romantic mysteries

Clare Chase’s fast-paced and thrilling romantic suspense novel, You Think You Know Me, is out in e-book format today. Read about her love of mysteries and the inspiration behind the novel here on Choc Lit corner. Happy Publication day, Clare! :)

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To me, asking if I’d like mystery mixed with my romance is like asking if I’d like a glass of wine with my chocolate.  Either one alone is wonderful, but if I’m allowed to wolf down both at once, I’m a happy woman. Each genre brings its own tension, intrigue and pulse-racing moments, and a mix of the two is a powerful combination.

I also really like the puzzle element. I love not knowing what hidden motives a character might have, and what secrets lie in their past. If I can’t sleep, I find wondering ‘whodunnit’ in the book I’m reading a lot more fun than counting sheep.

Not knowing who to trust ratchets up the tension for the protagonist too. In my novel, You Think You Know Me, the heroine, Anna, is faced with this dilemma. She feels an immediate and powerful connection with a man she’s just met, but finds within hours that he’s given her a false name. Torn between backing off and allowing him to explain, she gets drawn into a dangerous and unstoppable drama.

Romantic mystery is a classic sub-genre, and I was introduced to it quite young, when I first read Daphne du Maurier’s Jamaica Inn. I found it unbeatable: a passionate love story tightly interwoven with intrigue and danger.

Evocative settings mean a lot to me too. Du Maurier’s use of wild moorland was perfect. For my own story, set in the run-up to Christmas, the build-up takes place against the fast-moving backdrop of London, but the denouement makes use of the lonely beauty of the Lakes.

Once I’d got bitten by the romantic mystery bug, I lapped up Mary Stewart’s novels. Meanwhile books like Jilly Cooper’s Bella had me turning the pages so fast I ripped them. But the male thriller writers were just as inclined to pepper their stories with romantic intrigue. I remember finding Dick Francis’ novels quite educational on that front, when I first found them on my grandmother’s bookshelves.

Romantic mysteries are also the stuff of Hollywood, of course, from classics like Hitchcock’s Rear Window, (and indeed, Jamaica Inn), to the unfolding relationship between Jason and Marie in The Bourne Identity.

Sometimes the mystery is very much bound up with the romance, and resolving one leads straight on to the happy ever after in the other. But other authors follow relationship hurdles that are separate from the central plot. Nora Roberts, writing as JD Robb, uses this format in her novels about Detective Eve Dallas and her partner Roarke.

Like the books in its umbrella genres, the romantic mystery comes in many forms, but one thing it always promises is escapism and excitement. Wonderful though everyday often life is, I think there’s a huge benefit in that.

Twitter: @ClareChase_ 

Website: www.clarechase.com

Facebook: Clare Chase author page

Buy You Think You Know Me HERE today.

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Check out the awesome book trailer for You Think You Know Me here:

 

Sarah Tranter – Ten Days

When sitting down to write a post, I normally have to think about what to write. This time around, it’s more ― what NOT to write. And that’s all down to the past ten days. It has been one amazing happening after another. Just as I recover from one ― another hits me between the eyes. Although, to be honest, it’s my heart that they kind of connect with.

As a debut author, I was expecting many firsts. But I don’t think anything could have prepared me for the past ten days.

· NSTAI went live on kindle. A very good moment

· I held my book in my hands for the first time

· Attended my first function as a published author, rather than as an aspiring one

· Stood beside fellow ChocLiteers as I sold and signed my first book

· I received my first review

· I received messages from readers as they read NSTAI ― and they were positive ones at that.

· Oh ― and my husband, who never read the MS, actually started reading NSTAI. The most shocking of all occurrences. But pretty momentous.

The above is of course a list. It doesn’t touch on the emotions associated with each event. The feeling of exhilaration when you realise your book is available for people to read ― followed immediately by terror. What if they hate it? Is that just me? Does that feeling go away after you’ve the first one under your belt? I am hoping the nervous-wreck moments are down to going through this process for the first time ― and the fact I am cr*p. But I have a horrid suspicion it’s not.

I LOVE the highs. Seriously high highs. I’ve not stopped cradling and stroking my book since it arrived. And receiving positive feedback? It makes it all worthwhile. I dread the moment the negative comes in. But that’s clearly part of the emotional rollercoaster of being an author. I had NO idea what an author goes through. Hats off to you all. I bow to you. Because you seem to have got through the process intact. Emotionally, mentally … Well perhaps some of you, LOL. I think, perhaps, the secret is in the support we receive from our friends and fellow writers. It has been phenomenal ― and humbling. Thank you one and all. And on that note ― thank you ChocLiteers for all your support. And of course Choc Lit! I LOVE the finished product. Well the outside. I can’t bring myself to read the inside. And congratulations go again to Choc Lit for that ‘Publisher of the Year’ win and to Pia for best historical. You see ― all within the past ten days. What a ten days :)